Thanksgiving Personalized Products for Every Budget

Thanksgiving Day is a crop fiesta distinguished first and foremost in the United States of America and also Canada. Thanksgiving is a public holiday to convey gratitude, thankfulness, and admiration to God, relations and acquaintances for which all have been bestowed of material assets and relationships. Customarily, it Thanksgiving has been a way to relay recognition for an abundant yield. This anniversary has since strayed from its spiritual heredity.

In the United States of America, Thanksgiving Day falls on the fourth Thursday of November, and in Canada it is rejoiced on the succeeding Monday in the month of October.

Thanksgiving or Thanksgiving Day, presently fĂȘted on the fourth Thursday in November, has been a yearly practice in the United States of America beginning in the year 1863. Thanksgiving was in history a sacred day to offer gratitude to The Supreme Being.

It is notioned that the original Thanksgiving was celebrated to relay thankfulness to God for facilitating the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony continue to exist in their initial vicious wintry weather in New England. The earliest Thanksgiving banquet went on for three consecutive days granting sufficient sustenance for 53 pilgrims and 90 Native Americans. The extensive meal comprised poultry, lamb, fish, lobster, shellfish, strawberries, all types of fruit, pumpkin, and also squash. There was also an abundance of turkey present, giving rise to turkey being the choice meat for modern Thanksgiving celebrations.

On Thanksgiving Day, many businesses choose to reward their loyal clients and customers with personalized giveaways.

Besides the more common turkey motivated logo promotional products, there are some sources that can be mulled over as a free gift to these customers who butters your bread so to speak. Of course if you are taking into consideration offering them something extraordinary, ensure that these goods personify the word excellence. Remember that cheap items may not be of acceptable quality and instead become an embarrassment to you and your clients. Many personalized Thanksgiving gifts can be procured at inexpensive prices whilst still emphasizing on quality control. Cheap may look good in the beginning, but will definitely wear out in no time.

Understand the ways to assess your funds; assume something that is realistic and at the same time will not let you go broke. Rummage around for amazing but low-priced items that would work well into your resources at the same time will guarantee you great value and will relay recurring endorsement even without your direction. T-shirt is a first-rate case in point that equals this class. T-shirts can be embossed with the emblem and it has a promise of recurring advertisement since it is principal goods that humans are constantly wearing and buying.

Drink ware like mugs and insignia water bottles can also be superb Thanksgiving Day logo commodities. Every one requires water and it will be absolutely wonderful to gift clients an exceptional mug that is formed solely for them. Executing these actions will make them be aware of that they are precious to your Company. These are the kinds of personalized gifts that make Thanksgiving Day even more meaningful to many.

Who Needs Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Parabens in Their Personal Products?

Are you aware of all of the toxins in your personal products? Have you read your ingredients label on your toothpaste lately? How about your shampoo? It is alarming to know that even products that are known to be holistic or organic can still have some very dangerous chemicals in them.

Sodium lauryl sulfate is used as a degreaser. It is a known skin irritant. It also is corrosive and causes hair loss.

It can clean garage floors and is also used as a carwash soap.

Why is this product in our shampoos, toothpastes, and bath and shower gels? Well, for one thing it is and inexpensive foaming agent. Most companies probably stick with it because it does its job and it is cheap. Sodium laureth sulfate is a variation of this compound and has similar properties.

There is also controversy over parabens. Large doses of parabens have been found in breast cancer tissue. Some say that parabens are not transdermal. I, for one, would rather be safe than sorry. There is no conclusive evidence. So, sometimes we just have to trust ourselves.

We do not want to be neurotic about these things, but we do want to be safe. Educate yourselves. There is a lot of information out there.

There are products out there that do not include these or other dangerous chemicals. Although, I would rather not be neurotic about it, I don’t mind when the company that I order my products from is. Young Living Essential Oils creates a wide range of personal products that I feel very confident using. Their purity is outstanding. Check out their toothpaste, deodorant, shampoos, massage oils, household cleaning products and skin care line. I have never come across anything like this. I can rest assured that my health and my family’s health is secure with Young Living Products.

Pricing Your Products

In our scramble to find a way to offer the lowest prices on the Internet, we often overlook the basic steps that we should be taking BEFORE we even offer a product for sale.

We also overlook something even more important: you don’t HAVE to have the lowest price in order to make great sales. Following are some things I do before and after determining my bottom line. I sell by having products drop-shipped for my sites, which works VERY well, but these steps should be covered no matter your distribution method.

Should you be selling this item now?

Snowboards don’t sell well in the summertime. You may have a hard time moving a pair of roller blades in January. Don’t waste your time and your site space marketing products out of season. Ask your supplier for a little historical information regarding the best time to sell their products. Believe me, to everything, there IS a season. They have the figures. If they don’t want to share this info with you, find another supplier.

Identify your costs

Profit isn’t just the difference between wholesale and retail. You have other costs to consider. Think about every penny you spend in order to get that product to the customer’s door, and plan accordingly. For example, your merchant account probably costs you about 2.2% plus 30 cents per transaction. On an item you’ll sell for $20, that’s 74 cents. Don’t forget that calculation when pricing the item. Are you warehousing the item? How much is that space costing you per item per month? Did you spend money stocking up on shipping materials? How much per unit? What about advertising? Monthly hosting costs? You may need to project some estimated sales in order to arrive at some of these figures.

This may seem very complicated, but it’s really not. Just take the figures one at a time, and you’ll arrive at a wholesale cost plus an amount that, when added together, becomes your initial ESTIMATE of “cost of goods sold”. Identifying all your costs is critical if you want to price your products properly.

Check out the competition

Search on the item you plan to sell. Check out the competitors’ prices. But DON’T get caught up trying to beat the wrong competitor. You need to stay within your “venue”.

My stores are built in Yahoo Shopping (http://store.yahoo.com). 90% of my traffic comes from there. When I seek out my competitors, I look for other businesses like mine ONLY in Yahoo Shopping. Then I compare.

If I’m thinking about selling a product, and I get 1,500 hits in 400 stores on that item in Yahoo Shopping, forget it. If I get a hundred hits in 20 to 40 stores, I’ll look into it further.

So check out the competition, narrow down your product list, make a note of the five lowest prices you find, and then ask yourself another question:

Is anybody going to buy this thing?

This doesn’t have much to do with pricing, but it should be said.

When considering products, there’s unique, and then there’s too unique. Yak Cheese may sound like something that nobody else has for sale on the ‘Net. There’s a reason for that. If you sell more than 3 boxes a year, I’ll EAT some.

Unique is Rain Barrels made in Maine. It’s Exotic Cheeses imported from Italy. Silk Parisian Lingerie. Things you don’t see every day, but would be proud to give as a gift.

Then there’s “common”. Everybody and their grandmothers are selling Alabaster Figurines on the Internet. Do they sell? Sure, in a limited fashion. Do you want to sell them? Not if you want to make any real money.

In my experience, unique products, like Rain Barrels and Parisian Lingerie, DO sell. So do Coleman Sleeping Bags, and Conair Hair Dryers. BRAND NAMES sell. Look at your potential product, and ask yourself honestly if YOU would buy it on the ‘Net.

Set your price

Take the five lowest prices you collected on a product in your list that has survived the above. Calculate your estimated cost, then subtract that from the lowest price. If you don’t see at LEAST 15% profit, don’t bother.

If you do, there are a couple of ways to proceed. You can undercut the lowest price in your “venue” by a bit, and hope to “kick off” the product and get yourself noticed. Chances are, though, that the following week you’ll find that someone has undercut YOUR price by just a bit. That becomes a losing game.

I generally set up a couple of “loss leaders”. These are desirable items (in my general product line) that I sell dirt cheap just to bring in customers. Then I price the rest of my products at the second or third lowest price in my venue. The customers come in for the loss leaders, and then I can market everything else to them via email. I spend a lot of time making my site look better and easier to navigate, and pay a great deal of attention to my customers.

That makes me more reputable in the eyes of the customer. You’ll find that people don’t mind paying just a little more if they feel comfortable in your store. They don’t like to worry that they’re buying from a “hack” who may not deliver. Nothing says “hack” like a cluttered, confusing storefront.

Follow up

After you’ve sold an item for a month or two, revise that “cost of goods sold”. Measuring past performance is just as important as setting the correct price to begin with. If sales drop, recheck your competition. If that’s not it, drop the product, or shelve it until the “season” comes back around. Don’t get sentimental about your products, and NEVER just let your store sit there in limbo once it starts to make money. This is a dynamic business; stay on top of it!

A last word (or three)

Retail pricing on the Internet is so fraught with permutations that it would be impossible to cover everything here, even if I KNEW everything. The steps above are just the basics of a process that works for me. Hopefully something here will strike a chord and work for you as well. Patience and persistence are the keys to a successful Internet business, so hang in there, and don’t quit the day job for at least a couple of weeks. ;o)

I hope this helps in your future marketing decisions.